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Marine Life Blog » Indonesia, Lembeh » Frogfish and Abalone in Lembeh Strait

Frogfish and Abalone in Lembeh Strait

March 26 – 27 –We’ve seen a number of frogfish this week and they seem to be unusually mobile. Frogfish are ambush predators, blending into their environment by barely moving until prey comes within reach. In a flash, so fast in fact it is barely discernable on video played back in slow motion, they expand their cavernous mouths and hoover in their victims. My favorite was a beautiful green Giant Frogfish, Antennarius commersoni, bouncing along the bottom like a beach ball. We followed it from 20 up to 12 meters where it finally stopped, presumably in a favorite feeding spot. 

 Our dear friend and managing director of Eco Divers, Cary Yanny, is diving with us tonight. Cary is spending the month on property acting as dive manager and overseeing the completion of the new resort spa. This gives us the rare opportunity to spend some valued time in her company, even if it is only fleeting moments between her many duties. I’ve been teasing the busy lady about writing a story entitled “A Day in the Life of Cary – Resort Manager Extraordinaire,” so here goes.  Yesterday morning before breakfast, she dealt with a disconcerting crisis in the spa when a cat wandered into the open building, knocked over an open paint can, traipsed through the spill and performed an Irish jig, which left little white paw prints all over the recently installed hardwood floors. During breakfast she leapt up from the table to shoo a bird that had flown into the restaurant window. Just before lunch, she jumped fully clothed into the resort’s swimming pool to rescue a four-foot monitor lizard that, whether there on purpose or accidentally, was proving a formidable obstacle to guests waiting to bathe. Cary, ever the trooper, deals with one unforeseen happenstance after the other with grace, forbearance and good humor, pausing every now and again to regain a bit of sanity by repeating to herself the timeworn mantra, “ At least I do not have a boring life.” 

 

Our Cary

Our Cary

 Ned will take over here to describe a few details about last night’s dive:

 

Our search for marine animals from the Far Side continues; and as I love to say, “The seas never cease to amaze!” Here are three prime examples of off-the-wall gastropods that literally came off the wall at Nudi Falls, one of our all-time favorite night diving sites in the world. The first two fine fellows are abalones from genus Haliotis, which includes approximately a hundred species worldwide. Yes, these guys are closely related to the highly prized culinary delights, the white and the red abalones, harvested from California waters. The first, appropriately named the ass’s-ear abalone, Haliotis asinina, measuring about 5 inches in length, was found crawling along quite briskly at the base of the wall. 
 

Asses ear Abalone

Asses ear Abalone

 The second abalone, which is going to take a bit of research to pinpoint its species name, is only an inch across. It is much easier to recognize as an abalone by noting the spiral of the shell and the series of respiratory holes near the shell’s outer edge. 

 

Abalone

Abalone

 The third gastropod belongs in genus Scutus from family Fissurellidae, commonly known as shield shells because the internal shell’s shape. The actual animal is much larger than the shell, which can be seen through the central slit in the mantle.  ~ Ned & Anna
 

Shield Shell

Shield Shell

 

 

 

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One Response to "Frogfish and Abalone in Lembeh Strait"

  1. Breeze says:

    Reading your report is vilrtaluy unbearable as I am reliving the trip and the dives! I truly still cannot believe you actually have the heart to delete your pictures although I am trying painstakingly to learn the lesson. Having now seen your report it will be the hell of a lot easier thanks for this, it’s truly amazing. When are we off again?

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